Research Fellows

The Baldy Center is a focal point for the large group of scholars working on law, legal institutions, and social policy in the University at Buffalo community. The Center and Buffalo scholarly community are also closely connected to regional, national, and global sociolegal scholars. Accordingly, the Center seeks to facilitate the work of scholars with law and policy related interests by linking them into the Baldy community and its substantial scholarly resources.

On this page:

Ana Mariella Bacigalupo

Ana Mariella Bacigalupo

Ana Mariella Bacigalupo is a professor in the Department of Anthropology at SUNY Buffalo. Her research focuses on cultural transformation within systems of knowledge and power, and she centers her work in the perspective of Mapuche shamans in Chile and Argentina, their communities, and their critics. She studies how and why powerful outsiders imagine shamans as exotic remnants of a folkloric past, as sorcerers and gender deviants, as savage terrorists, or as lacking historical consciousness and investigates the complex ways in which shamans and their communities play off and challenge these stereotypes for a variety of ends.

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Bacigalupo also writes about the memory politics of the spirits of Mapuche killed by the Chilean state. Bacigalupo has published five books, authored fifty articles and chapters, and garnered numerous fellowships to support her research from organizations including but not limited to the Max Planck Institutes, John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University, School for Advanced Research, National Endowment for the Humanities, and Rockefeller Foundation. Bacigalupo’s work has recently taken a legal turn as she has begun to examine the relationships between Mapuche shamanic notions of justice, LGBT parenting, Chilean family law imbued with Catholic morality, and the discourse of international human rights.

As a research fellow at the Baldy Center, Bacigalupo will analyze Chilean judge Karen’s Atala’s transformative shamanic vision and legal battle as a lesbian mother against the Chilean Supreme Court for the custody of her children, as well as how the Inter-American Court of Human Rights produced a change in Chilean legislation in favor of custody rights for homosexual and gender-variant parents, including Mapuche shamans.

Faculty Profile, UB CAS Department of Anthropology: Mariella Bacigalupo

Academia.edu:  Mariella Bacigalupo

Jennifer L. Gaynor

Jennifer L. Gaynor

Jennifer L. Gaynor earned her PhD in History and Anthropology at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and prior to coming to SUNY at Buffalo held fellowships at Michigan, Cornell, and the Australian National University. A scholar of Southeast Asia and its surrounding seas from the seventeenth century to the present, she is the author of Intertidal History in Island Southeast Asia: Submerged Genealogy and the Legacy of Coastal Capture (Cornell University Press, 2016). She has contributed chapters to Seascapes: Maritime Histories, Littoral Cultures and Transoceanic Exchanges, edited by Jerry Bentley, Renate Bridenthal, and Kären Wigen (University of Hawai'i Press, 2007); Ocean Legalities: The Law and Life of the Sea, edited by Irus Braverman and Elizabeth R. Johnson (Duke University Press, forthcoming); and Early Modern East Asia: War, Commerce, and Cultural Exchange: Essays in Honor of John E. Wills, Jr., edited by Kenneth Swope and Tonio Andrade (Routledge, Asian States and Empires, 2017). Among other articles, she has written about cross-regional thinking and ages of sail in The Journal of World History; analyzed the political economy of nature in a global age in Radical History Review; and theorized piracy through Southeast Asian history in Anthropological Quarterly. Recently, she has been building on her early modern findings through a series of European conferences and workshops, largely on the history of slavery in Asia. At the same time, she is also engaged in a second book project, on contemporary history, that crosses archipelagos and ocean basins to examine land reclamation for strategic reasons and capitalist gain.

Rachael K. Hinkle

Rachael K. Hinkle

Rachael K. Hinkle earned her PhD in Political Science from Washington University in St. Louis and her J.D. from Ohio Northern University. She is currently an assistant professor in the Department of Political Science at the University at Buffalo, SUNY. Her research agenda focuses on judicial politics with particular attention to gleaning insights into legal development from the content of judicial opinions through the use of computational text analytic techniques. This work is informed by her experience clerking for the Honorable David W. McKeague in the U.S. Court of Appeals and the Honorable Robert C. Broomfield in the U.S District Court.

Jennifer S. Hunt

Jennifer S. Hunt

Jennifer S. Hunt is an Associate Professor of Psychology at SUNY Buffalo State College, where she recently completed a six year term as Coordinator of the Women and Gender Studies program. She previously has been on the faculty at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Jenn’s research uses empirical social psychology to examine how race, ethnicity, and culture impact juror decision making, leading to discrimination in legal outcomes, as well as influence jurors’ participation and behavior during deliberation. In addition, her work examines jurors’ use of character evidence, revealing that jurors often misuse this information in ways that are detrimental to defendants.

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Jenn also conducts some basic social psychological research on gender ideology, influences on gender development, and stereotype processes. Her work has been published in a number of journals and books and been funded by the National Science Foundation. Jenn earned her Ph.D. in Social Psychology with a minor in Law in the University of Minnesota in 2001. Jenn is active in the American Psychology-Law Society and recently was elected to its executive committee as a member-at-large. She serves on the editorial board of Law and Human Behavior. In 2012, she was awarded the Action Teaching Award from the Social Psychology Network.

Recent publications include:

Hunt, J.S. (in press). Race, ethnicity, and culture in jury decision making. Article to appear in Annual Review of Law and Social Science (Vol. 11).

Hunt, J.S. (2015). Race in the justice system. In B.L. Cutler & P.A. Zapf (Eds.), APA handbook of forensic psychology (Vol. 2, pp. 125-161). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association

Hunt, J.S., Girvan, E.J., Deason, G., & Borgida, E. (2013). Gender stereotyping. In J. Sanders, D.L. Faigman, E. Cheng, J. Mnookin, E. Murphy, & J. Blumenthal (Eds.), Modern scientific evidence: The law and science of expert testimony (2012-2013 ed., pp. 707-775). St. Paul, MN: West Publishing Co.

Maeder, E.M., & Hunt, J.S. (2011). Talking about a Black man: The influence of defendant and character witness race on juror’s use of character evidence. Behavioral Sciences and the Law, 29, 608-620.

Tricia Semmelhack

Tricia Semmelhack

Tricia Semmelhack received her JD (SUNY Buffalo '74) and entered private practice with a focus on intellectual property, computer law and licensing. Her earlier education (Brown University AB'60)and the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy (MA'61) focused on international relations. During her career, she co-founded and chaired the Intellectual Property Law Section of the NYS Bar Association, and presented numerous papers in the US and Canada on IP and computer issues. A special paper was given in China to the Shanghai Business Men's Association on the copyrightability of computer software when China was engaged in rampant piracy of US protected works. Having retired from her partnership at Hodgson Russ LLP, she has renewed her interest in international law with a close study of Hugo Grotius's famous work, The Law of War and Peace.