The Baldy Center Podcast

Money falling from above, Stock photo via Canva Pro, 2020.

Money falling from above; stock image via Canva Pro, 2020.

Episode 7: Daniel Platt discusses “The Domestication of Credit.”

Published November 3, 2020

Episode 7 features Daniel Platt, Assistant Professor at University of Illinois Springfield and former Baldy Center Postdoctoral Fellow. Professor Platt discusses his recent article “The Domestication of Credit,” focused on the moral politics of personal finance in 19th and 20th century U.S., paying specific attention to women’s contributions to household finances, to credit, debt, and financial institutions, and to the roles of coercion and discrimination in a debt economy.

Keywords: Finance and Finance Law, Legal History, Politics, Cultural History 

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Daniel Platt, University of Illinois Springfield

Research Focus: Law, Cultural History, History of Capitalism
Daniel Platt.

Daniel Platt

Daniel Platt is a teacher and scholar specializing in law, cultural history, and the history of capitalism. He earned his PhD in American Studies at Brown University in 2018 and was a postdoctoral fellow at the Baldy Center for Law & Social Policy at the University at Buffalo. Learn more.

Article citation: Daniel Platt; The Domestication of Credit. History of the Present 1 October 2019; 9 (2): 142–165. doi

I’ve found financial markets to have been positively entangled with patriarchy, sexism, and the law of coverture throughout the 19th and early 20th centuries.”
—Daniel Platt

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