GHS Labels

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All secondary chemical containers of hazardous materials, including wash bottles, stock solutions, and carboys must now have Globally Harmonized System (GHS) labels attached in order to be considered in compliance with OSHA regulations.

Determining Hazardous Materials

You can determine if you have a hazardous material by referencing section 2.2 of the chemical's Safety Data Sheet.  GHS labels can provided upon request. An example of a GHS compliant label is shown below:

Example GHS Label

Typical Globally Harmonized System (GHS) label describing hydrochloric acid

Sample GHS Label (actual size 1.5" x 2-13/16")





Why GHS Labels are Required

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has revised their Hazard Communications Standard in 29 CFR to include the adoption of the United Nations Globally Harmonized System (GHS) classification and labeling of chemicals. The purpose of these newer regulations is to provide lab workers with better information on the safe handling and use of hazardous chemicals, thereby allowing them to avoid injuries and illnesses related to exposures to hazardous chemicals.

All newly purchased reagent bottles will have compliant labels already attached. In most cases, you do not have to dispose of older reagent bottles.

Contact an Expert

Head Shot of Anthony Oswald Hazardous Materials Manager

Anthony Oswald

Hazardous Materials Manager; Chemical Hygiene Officer

Environment, Health & Safety

Phone: 716-829-5681

Email: acoswald@buffalo.edu

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